The Ragdoll is a cat breed with blue eyes and a distinct colorpoint coat. It is a large and muscular semi-longhair cat with a soft and silky coat. Like all long haired cats, Ragdolls need grooming to ensure their fur does not mat. Developed by American breeder Ann Baker in the 1960s, it is best known for its docile and placid temperament and affectionate nature. The name "Ragdoll" is derived from the tendency of individuals from the original breeding stock to go limp and relaxed when picked up.[1] Particularly popular in both the United Kingdom and the breed's native United States, ragdoll cats often are known as "dog-like cats" or "puppy-like cats" due to behaviors such as their tendency to follow people around, their ease at being physically handled, and their relative lack of aggression toward other pets. In the 1960's, a regular non pedigreed white domestic longhaired cat named Josephine produced several litters of typical cats. Josephine was of a Persian/Angora type and had litters sired by several unknown male Birman or Burmese-like cats, one of which had the Siamese point coloration. Josephine later produced kittens with a docile, placid temperament, affectionate nature, and a tendency to go limp and relaxed when picked up. When a subsequent litter produced more of the same, Ann Baker purchased several kittens from the owner who lived behind her and, believing that she had something special, set out to create what is now known as the ragdoll. The breed was selectively bred over many years for desirable traits, such as large size, gentle demeanor, and a tendency to go limp when picked up, as well as the striking pointed coloration.

Rules and Regulations

Indoor-Only: Because cats live much longer, safer lives indoors, CAT adopts to indoor-only homes.

In rare cases (typically when cats have persistent behavioral problems, such as inappropriate elimination, for which CAT veterinary staff have found no physical cause), cats may be approved to go to an indoor/outdoor home. Those adopting cats designated for possible indoor/outdoor homes go through CAT’s normal adoption process and sign a contract specific to indoor/outdoor situations.

Declawing: CAT asks adopters not to declaw adopted cats. Your adoption counselor can provide information about the detriments of declawing, humane alternatives, and how to train a cat to use a scratching post.

For adopters looking for declawed cats, there are almost always previously declawed cats at CAT awaiting adoption.

Kittens: Kittens must be 8-10 weeks old before they are available for adoption. This ensures that kittens receive a strong, healthy start in life and minimizes behavior problems because they are fully weaned and litter box trained. All kittens are spayed or neutered prior to adoption.

Kittens under six weeks of age are listed on CAT’s foster care list but are not available for viewing.

© 2017 By Adorable Sweetie

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